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May 2022

Onbekend Maakt Onbemind

55/04

Onbekend Maakt Onbemind

Don’t worry, it’s not going to be a Dutch language edition. The title translates quite directly to “unknown makes unloved”, a saying that addresses the problem of the world around us just being too big for our understanding. Some of us dearly want to love and care for everything around, but how can you love what you don't know? This edition is about opening up the bubbles that we seem to live in, in search for what lies beyond.

Editorial team

Inez Margaux Spaargaren, Robert van Overveld, Oliwia Jackowska, Jonas Althuis, Alessandro Rognoni, Tuyen Le

With contributions from

Vineet Dhall, Nathan Kramer

Cover design by

Editorial team

Editorial

"Onbekend maakt onbemind", unknown makes unloved, ignoti nulla cupido, unbekannt ungenannt, on n’aime que ce qu’on connaît, etc.

How will our behaviour change once we know what we don’t know yet, and how will we see our fellow humans in this different light? How many things that we do today will we stop doing in the future? Today’s theme is about all the things that we cannot appreciate, love, or understand yet because we are unaware of them. 

Each one has their own experiences with life, leading to different perspectives about what this world is. Some will see the world and their lives as broken. Some just can’t stop loving it. Others will see it as a play or even feel confident enough to juggle with it. You can feel connected to others on some occasions. Other times it feels like your worlds couldn’t be further away from one another.

When we started this edition, the war also started. We all dealt with our emotions differently at the time and thought differently about what it meant. It’s a situation that we are all still shocked by. The war in Ukraine gave the concept of war a depth that we youngsters didn’t know yet. An understanding that all the other wars in the last decades weren’t able to give most of us. And still is it only a glimpse of what those on the frontier must experience.

We put these aspects on the cover, filling the background sky with fighter jets. The faces and brain chambers in the front illustrate the different conclusions of our life experiences and also our perspectives on the war. Some faces don’t seem to think about it, rather enjoying the moon, stars or people around them. The depth of the chambers themselves can be seen as the depth of someone’s thinking. 

Without further ado, enjoy this edition!

Contents

Visible Makes Invisible

Pen Pal

4 - 6

pg.

A tale of neither man or woman that are the face of the crowd and not the crowd.

Unknown makes unloved, an interesting proverb isn’t it? Just by definition one can associate unknown with unfamiliarity, something that is yet to be revealed, or maybe something we share a complex dialect with. Through my limited experience, I have also felt how we often don’t fear the unknown, but rather what we project onto the unknown. Being Indian, my “limited experience” obviously would like to peel one such complexity that is part of the Indian fabric, but that over time has mutated into different roles and identities within the society.

As the Wind Rises and Falls

From the editors

7 - 8

pg.

If the Netherlands could choose a flag to represent its culture, the wood windmill would be the single most iconic thing to be on it. With such a tight knitted relationship that this country has for wind, the 2000s era has cultivated the wind into energy, and technology no longer evoke the same feelings as the friendly windmill, but rather, aliens in the empty fields, blank obstructions by the lonely highways. While they hold virtually no meaningful cultural values, can we still humanise the industrial wind turbines? Can we care for them as part of the modern relationship that the Netherlands associates with wind as it rises and falls?

The Art of the Commute

From the editors

9 - 11

pg.

In many ways, projects for urban transit deal with the act of commuting, one that is essential to urban life as we know it. Recognising, embracing and loving the commute might be the key to joy in the increasingly alienating metropolis; to do so, we may have to look back at times when such concerns were at the core of urban design.

The Hot and Cold of Disseminating

BK Report

12 - 13

pg.

Before the Internet, architecture enthusiasts relied on magazines to stay up-to-date on the daily happenings in architecture. As humans, our hunger for news and media hastily yearns for opinionated pieces to stimulate our daily life. The users are constantly evolving, how can the publishing houses disseminate their gathered knowledge and content? It is a question the Bnieuws team is involved in to reflect, along with the panellists of professionals form the publishing world during the BK Talk - Disseminate: The Present and future of editorial practice.

The Future of Home

From the editors

14 - 17

pg.

A few months ago, three students, Saif Ragaei, Ammar Yasser and Mariam Ihab, interviewed by KooZA/rch,  realised “how unstable the notion of normal life is by examining the situations where this sense of normalcy is destroyed in a horrific suddenness.” They questioned the fragility of our day to day in the face of political conflict and natural disasters and for the theme of the future of home they sent their contribution of technical drawings of destruction.

Where Earthquakes Come at Night

From the editors

18 - 21

pg.

At the heart of a city called Kiruna stands an ordinary red brick building, the function of which is conveyed in red capital letters above it's main entrance; Folkets Hus, Swedish for 'community house'. As such, the building houses a variety of public functions; café, cinema, theatre, tourist information centre, souvenir shop, micro-museum. It's a place where the residents of Kiruna can gather, and where visiting tourists can use the bathroom. 

Challenging Steps

From the editors

22 - 24

pg.

Dear Bnieuws reader, It can sometimes be tough to take challenging steps. The theme of this Bnieuws follows from the unknown. What is it like abroad? I have asked myself this question lately, so I decided to take action… 

Her Drawing

BK Report

25 - 27

pg.

“The Architect, History and Her Drawing” is an exhibition organised by the students of the Architectural History Thesis course taught by Jurjen Zeinstra in the first and second semester. 

The Mint Situation

Pen Pal

28 - 29

pg.

The following is a confession: I have developed a ‘thing’ for mint syrup. There are quite a bunch of those aluminium bottles with the greeny, gooey, sticky, funky fresh liquid staring at me from the fridge. Not to even mention the bulk bottle staring down from the countertop, judgingly. My friends had gotten air of this and given me beakers with mint leaves and what not at parties. I’m not complaining.

Artefact: Doppelgänger

Artefact

30 - 31

pg.

Historically, in fiction and mythology, a doppelgänger is portrayed as a ghostly double, a paranormal oddity, and harbinger of bad luck. Meeting ourselves, and being left disappointed, it’s a terrifying thought nonetheless. So we avoid listening to our own recordings: we’d rather deal with calculated selfies, or premeditated TikTok performances, then listen to our voice at its natural state. 

BKINO POSTER: Flodder

From the editors

32

pg.

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